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20121128
20121206
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
civil rights. but as the tool has become a regular tool of political warfare, scrutiny of the procedure has increased and questions raised about its impact on the chamber. now, reid and other senate democrats want to change the rules to eliminate the 60-vote threshold needed to formally begin debate on a bill; and require a "talking filibuster," forcing senators to make their case on the floor for hours and hours, like jimmy stewart did in the 1939 film "mr. smith goes to washington." >> i'm not, and i'm going to stay right here and fight for this lost cause. >> holman: or former south carolina senator strom thurmond, who spoke for over 24 hours in an attempt to defeat the civil rights act of 1957. but in today's senate, where 60 votes are needed to pass almost any piece of legislation, it means even the threat of a filibuster can gum up the process. democratic leader harry reid says enough is enough. >> we have this crazy idea, mr. president, that if we're going to have a filibuster, you have to stand and say something, not hide in your office someplace or go to a wedding that you're h
in this fashion, and use them in unprecedented numbers. host: and according to history, civil rights was one of those things the filibuster got used for. >> what's interesting about those is while it wasn't a partisan issue, it was a factual issue. dirksen was a great hero of the civil rights revolution right alongside his partner, lyndon johnson. it was the southern democrats, but at the -- that point in time, it was the southern democrats that wanted to talk and one held a record of talking for 24 hours straight. these are filibusters where they don't want to take the floor and they have no interest in debating. it's all to block things. when you get a filibuster when you have bills that pass unanimously, it becomes clear that this was not a matter of principle over a particular bill but a tool of obstruction. host: randy in minnesota, republican line, good morning. go ahead. caller: yes. good morning, c-span. this filibuster thing, this is the perfect way for our government to work the way our government was set up to work with checks and balances. with the filibuster rule, -- i'm getting
it happen, but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibusters done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans just as they were by notary -- non-southern departments, and civil rights legislation, overcoming filibusters being enacted was at least as much to the credibility of the senate minority leader as to lyndon johnson so what we've seen now is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party as fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues with the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near unanimously, and keep in mind on no , nomins where holds, which are notices that you will deny unanimous concept, and in some instances have been filibust
about it or were willing to put everything on the line to make it happen. but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in a sense. they were factional. the fact is that the filibusters done by southern democratic senators who opposed civil rights are voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans. just as they were by a non-southern democrats. and the fact is that civil rights legislation and overcoming those filibusters are being enacted were as much to the credit and responsibility of the senate minority leader as lyndon johnson. so what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster tool. the entire party is fashioned by the majority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not simply on those issues where the majority leader though the amendment. but on issues and nominations which ultimately passed unanimously or near unanimously. keep in mind nominations, in which he denied unanimous consent, in some instances have been the luster, a lot of them on executive nomination, you don't have amendme
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
intensely about it, where will put everything on the line to make it happen. in the civil rights era, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibuster's done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights in a deflation were opposed by republicans, just as they were by non- southern democrats. the fact is that civil rights and legislation and overcoming this filibuster's and being enacted which at least as much to the credit and responsibility of everett dirksen, the minority leader, as to lyndon johnson. what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool, and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party has fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues where the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near it unanimously. keep in mind on nominations, where holds w
was working with the house judiciary committee on getting that civil rights bill through, using the cardinal in philadelphia, using boss dick daley in chicago to try to get some members there. he was working, working, working. it is a job, politics. it's an honor and it's a job. you got to do it, and i think the president would learn from this fellow jack kennedy. as gamerrous as this guy was, he was a worker bee when it comes to politics and i think the more the president spends time with members of congress on the hill, the more liberal as well as the more conservative, the more personal sometime he spends with those people the better shot he has at establishing a working relationship. it's not done by the telephone. you go the to meet, you got to get in the same room together. >> words of wisdom. words from history. chris matthews, as ever. thank you so much. >> you're a great colleague, sir. >> thank you, sir. >>> next, why team romney and republicans still don't get it. stay with us. >> of what has happened to this country when i sing "white christmas" now, i will no doubt be deemed to
was known for being one of the first supporters of civil rights. he died in beaumont after a sudden illness. he was widely known for this photograph standing behind president johnson as he's being sworn in aboard air force one in 1963. brooks was also in the dallas motorcade when jfk was shot. >>> president obama's chief speechwriter might be leaving. "the washington post" reports john favro is not clear if he'll write the president's inaugural address first. >>> where is jan brewer? she notified her office she'd be gone for a week but didn't say where she'd be going. her staff says it is official business. >>> two big milestones for women, congressman nita lowie will be the ranking democrat, making her the highest in that ki committee's history and elizabeth warren is expected to be named to the senate banking committee. according to the "wall street journal" it could be a signal from the democrats to wall street to watch out. >>> we're barely out of the november 2012 elections and there's talk what big names you could see in the ballot box ahead. richard lui is here with that. >> that's t
to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this process. barry and others have talked about the importance of
's most bright, great jazz musicians, he was also a fighter for civil rights and justice. bill cosby reflects on his extraordinary life next. the holidays are here and we're here with cyreeta talking about the walmart low price guarantee. that's your receipt from another store? it is! let's put it to the test. alright! that's walmart's everyday low price. get out! ok, but i'm taking these! ready? yes. there you have it! that much? that's the walmart low price guarantee. see for yourself. bring in your last receipt and see how much you can save. be ready. with the season's tastiest brands. like nestle toll house morsels. bake the very best this season. walmart has everything you need to be ready for holiday hosting. with our low price guarantee backed by ad match. walmart. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. yep. the longer you stay with us, the more you save. and when you switch from another company to us, we even reward you
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
our civil system. >> sean: are we or aren't we, though? >> i don't know, sean. that's the problem. >> sean: we had promises in the past that appear to be broken. >> right. >> and a setup report that says, oh, yeah we can hold these -- >> sean: this goes back -- >> they play by their own rules, sean. that's the problem. legally speaking they're finding a way to get around it and circumvent the rules to make it work based on the promises that they made prior to the election. that's what this is. i'm not surprised. they said they wanted to do this, tried to back off it, because it's controversial and improper. why would you, given the prison population, put these people in to create more domestic terrorists? >> sean: i think i know the answer. it seems to be rooted in man-caused disaster, overseas contingency, fort hood is workplace violent, and can't label benghazi a terrorist attack. there's a pattern of denial about what the threat is. >> now we can worry about how we're going to house these folks, but i'd like worry about how to find the mastermind who's been identified in every
to pay for the clean-up. right? >> that's right. they set aside a $20 billion fund voluntarily to compensate victims. there is also going to be additional penalties as part of civil violations of the clean water act, estimated to be 21 billion. >> that's probably going to be handed down in the next few months. this is just to settle criminal charges for the company pled guilty to 14 criminal guilty pleas, 11 counts 50 seaman's manslaughter, a criminal violation of the clean water act, a migratory bird act and for obstruction of justice, for submitting false information to the congressional investigation during the summer of 2010. >> the 20 billion clean-up fund the 21mul billion. >> for the clean water. >> billion? 41? so this criminal fine was? >> four and a half 689. >> >>. >> so $50,000,000,000. >> the company said aside all of that money. they had been selling off assets and they've got a huge cash reserve and the 20 billion for clean up that's in the fund. >> they can absorb this and stay in business? >> absolutely. >> that's been their plan.
right for more tierney into people's personal and private lives. >> your position on this. >> thanks forking havin for hav, sean. i agree with katie. not a matter of just personal privacy and civil liberties, also a matter of business independence and allowing businesses to operate without intrusion from the government and being told what they need to do in order to take these preventives steps. so it seems like a lot of overreach both in private lives. i know a lot of people in law enforcement. they're doing just fine with the tools at their current disposal. >> we want to help them as much as possible. it has to be reasonable search and seizure. i think the way we achieve that is if they have a suspect, we have a system of checks and balances. we have a judiciary. they have the ability, katie, to go to court and request a tap on somebody's e-mails. >> right. >> etc. and text messaging and why would we want to put private companies in the middle of that? >> well, this is the thing. coming from a private company perspective, private companies like verizon, t-mobile, all these tech-ty
responsible for paying civil penalties. bill: late last night if you missed this, the senate voted to keep the terror suspects at gitmo right where they are. they will not come here if the senate has its way. the measure will block the transfer of detainees to u.s. soil. a day of at report identified facilities in the u.s. believed to be capable housing them. senators approved the measure, 54-41. general yak keen, jack keane, is flies to see you again. melissa: good morning, bill. bill: does this mean gitmo does not close not even in a second term or does the president come and veto this? melissa: there i think will be pressure to try to close it which doesn't make a lot of sense to me. we have enemy combatants in there as a result of a war. the frustration is the war has gone on for a long time and therefore we should do something about these detainees. we're not making the choice for the war going on a long time. the al qaeda and affiliates are making that choice. they just burned down our consulate and killed our ambassador and forced close sure of a cia base. they're protracking the wa
're moving on to today's other important developments, including syria's bloody civil and this special envoy for the middle east, the former british prime minister tony blair is standing by to join us right here in "the situation room." ♪ the weather outside is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delightful ♪ nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. ♪ ha ha! well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> today, nato approved turkey's request for patriot missiles to d
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)